Car-Capsule-Vintage-Mustang

(Image/CarCapsule USA)

Ever wish you could store your ride in a protective bubble to prevent damage from Mother Nature, kids’ bikes, door dings, and curious critters?

Well, CarCapsule USA vehicle encolsures are basically that same thing.

Whether you store it inside or out, these protective bubbles are the perfect solution for long-term indoor or outdoor storage of your car, truck, motorcycle, or boat.

The large, quick-setup Pro Station is also a great option for mobile car detailing or any business that needs a portable, weather resistant space to work in.

CarCapsule USA makes several variations of its vehicle enclosures, so you can choose the exact size you need and pick the right one for your storage environment (indoor, outdoor, etc.).

There are even special ShowCase versions of the CarCapsule that are tailor-made for car shows and events.

Car Capsule

This is one of CarCapsule USA’s “ShowCase” models, designed for indoor storage and temporary vehicle displays. (Image/CarCapsule USA)

The enclosures include a fan that will inflate the pod and circulate filtered air several times an hour. That will help maintain a consistent temperature while preventing moisture from building-up inside your vehicle.

The 12-volt fan can run on household AC power and CarCapsule says the average cost to run one is about $1.50 a month.

The capsule’s base mat is impervious to oil, gas, and antifreeze, and will resist flames, mildew, and abrasion.

The outdoor versions have an opaque bubble which can ward-off the sun’s harmful effects, and keep prying eyes off of your ride.

Better still, the PVC bubble will protect your ride from damage from things like falling rakes, bouncing soccer balls, and tree sap.

Want to see it thwart an onslaught of garage attacks? Check this out:

And you can watch how easy it is to set up a CarCapsule here:

 

Share this Article
Author: Paul Sakalas

Paul is the editor of OnAllCylinders. When he's not writing, you'll probably find him fixing oil leaks in a Jeep CJ-5 or watching a 1972 Corvette overheat. An avid motorcyclist, he spends the rest of his time synchronizing carburetors and cleaning chain lube off his left pant leg.