Perhaps no other color is as nuanced as the humble shade of green. From eyeball-searing fluorescents to earthy flats, green occupies an astoundingly large palette in the automotive world.

So with all those options, we thought it’d be fun to go through as many as we could and pick our 10 favorite factory green paint jobs. Check out our list, and if you disagree with any of our choices, let’s hear about it in the comments section below.

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10. Brewster Green

(Image/OnAllCylinders)

While it’s similar to a popular late model Porsche color, we think the Pontiac Firebird Trans Am of the 1970s wears it better. Honestly we’re torn between the Corvette’s “Brands Hatch” Green and the Brewster Green here—it might actually be the same color with a different name.

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9. Lime Green Vitality

(Image/Kawasaki)

Did you know Kawasaki’s signature neon green paint has an official name? Yup, it’s called “Lime Green Vitality.” Kawasaki’s been rocking the color for over fifty years, and it has been worn to victory by famous racers like Gary Nixon and Eddie Lawson.

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8. Mint Green

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While many automakers have a “mint” green on their respective chip charts, we’re talking specifically about the Mint Green that adorned Jeep CJ Renegades during the 1970s. Why? Well, not only is it a cool color, it got its name in honor of the The Mint 400 Off-Road Race.

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7. Sequoia Green Poly

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We absolutely wanted to put something from the vibrant 1950s color palette on the list without going full-on seafoam, and Pontiac’s Sequoia Green Poly fit the bill perfectly. Bonus points here for the white-on-green two-tone covering this 1955 Safari wagon.

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6. Mist Green

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Maybe it’s the nostalgia talking, but any ranking of automotive greens has to include the ubiquitous “metallic pea” that was so pervasive during the 1970s. While every automaker had its own slightly different flavor, we chose Plymouth’s Mist Green here because something about that contrasting woodgrain just makes us smile.

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5. Synergy Green Metallic

green chevy camaro at a summit racing car show
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A perfect green for the 21st century. It’s very reminiscent of Chevy’s Rallye Green from the late 1960s, yet has a modern look that makes it an excellent complement to the nouveau-retro style of the fifth-gen Camaro.

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4. Olive Drab

front grille and side view of a ford gpw world war 2 military jeep
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Though it’s often referred to as “Army Green,” the color’s technical name is Olive Drab (and it’s not always the same shade either). While there’s obviously a function-over-form intent here, Olive Drab looks good on anything from a Ford GPW to a down-and-dirty hot rod.

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3. Highland Green

Ford Mustang bullitt 1968 highland green
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Sure, Ford made Mustangs in other colors during the 1968 model year—but after the movie “Bullitt” came out, it didn’t really matter. Dressed in Torq Thrust wheels and a coat of Highland Green paint, the Bullitt Mustang is one of the most iconic vehicles ever to grace the silver screen.

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2. British Racing Green

green 1963 lotus elan british sports car at indoor car show
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Just like Olive Drab, British Racing Green encompasses more than just one exact shade. But it has become the obligatory choice for any race team campaigning under the Union Jack. In fact, pretty much every race fan on the planet knows this family of colors simply by the “BRG” acronym.

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1. Sassy Grass/Green Go/Limelight/Sublime Green

1970 plymouth superbird with high impact sassy grass green paint
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Insert whichever one of Mopar’s “High Impact” greens you’d like here, because they’re all equally memorable. These greens are so inexorably linked with the musclecar heyday of the late 1960s, it’s no surprise Dodge brought them back on its late model Challenger and Charger.

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Now, what’d we miss? Should we have included some turquoise here? Did Grabber Green get snubbed? What about VW’s Irish Green? Let us know in the comments below!

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Author: Paul Sakalas

Paul is the editor of OnAllCylinders. When he's not writing, you'll probably find him fixing oil leaks in a Jeep CJ-5 or watching a 1972 Corvette overheat. Thanks to a penchant for vintage Honda motorcycles, he spends the rest of his time fiddling with carburetors and cleaning chain lube off his left pant leg.