Editor’s Note: This series counts down the Top 10 engines of all time—see how the voting was done by reading our initial post.

Tomorrow, we’ll reveal your #1 engine of all time.

Before we do, we thought we’d give a little love to those engines that just missed the Top 10. These are engines that garnered quite a few votesjust not enough to make the final 10.

truckinwebFord Flathead V8

In all honesty, this one would have definitely been in our Top 10. Unfortunately, this legendary engine came up just short in the voting and finished just outside the list. The Ford Flathead 221 is essentially the engine that started the hot rod movementHot Rod magazine even did a comprehensive guide to the Flathead.

Courtesy of Barrett-Jackson.com

Courtesy of Barrett-Jackson.com

Ford Boss 429

The Ford 429 engine was born in 1968 but became legend in 1969. That’s when Ford introduced the Boss 429 Mustang, which was powered by a Boss 429 engine rated at 375 horsepower. By most estimates the rating was quite lowas were many ratings during the muscle car warsand the engine actually churned out over 500 horsepower!

Courtesy of Chevystreetperformance

Courtesy of Chevystreetperformance

Chevrolet 327

The Chevrolet 327 came in multiple horsepower versions and was offered in a wide range of automobiles from 1962-69. Because of the mass availability of parts for this small block engine, it remains a favorite among hot roddersas the voting proved.

Courtesy of tripowerguy.com

Courtesy of tripowerguy.com

Pontiac 421 Tri-Power

The Pontiac 421, most specifically the 421 Tri-Power, was popular among voters. The engine was initially introduced as a racing engine for the 1961 and 1962 model years, but was released for the general population in 1963. The 421 Tri-Power was basically the king of Pontiac performance in the 1960s, delivering 376 horsepower.

Courtesy of holley.com

Courtesy of holley.com

Ford 302

The 351 Windsor made the Top 10, but the 302 was one of the longest running engines of all time. First offered in 1968, the 302 is best known by performance enthusiasts for its use in the Mustang. It was also commonly known as the Ford 5.0L, although it actually only 4.942 liters. (The 4.9L moniker was already taken by the 300 I6).

 

 

Courtesy of barrett-jackson.com

Courtesy of barrett-jackson.com

Chrysler 440

Although not as powerful at the 426 HEMI, the Chrysler 440 could be purchased for about half the price. The bang-for-buck power made this engine a favorite among voters for the Top 10 list. The 440 was the last of the Chrysler mills above the 400 cubic inch mark, and with the addition of the “six-pack” carburetor setup from 1969-71, it really packed a punch.

Courtesy of Ecomodder.com

Courtesy of Ecomodder.com

Buick 3.8L Turbo

In 1987, the Buick Grand National was called America’s quickest car. This was due to its use of the Buick 3.8L turbo, which was first introduced at the 1976 Indianapolis 500, where it was used in the pace car. By 1978, Buick offered the 3.8L turbo as a production engine and its popularity rose throughout the 1980s.

SOURCES: Enginefacts.com, AllPar.com

 

 

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Author: David Fuller

David Fuller is OnAllCylinders' managing editor. During his 20-year career in the auto industry, he has covered a variety of races, shows, and industry events and has authored articles for multiple magazines. He has also partnered with mainstream and trade publications on a wide range of editorial projects. In 2012, he helped establish OnAllCylinders, where he enjoys covering all facets of hot rodding and racing.